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EU broader political framework on combatting proliferation of weapons of mass destruction January 15, 2009

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Today, the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and their delivery systems poses an even greater threat to the security of European citizens than at the time the European Strategy against Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction was adopted.
The proliferation of nuclear, biological and chemical weapons and ballistic and cruise missiles remains a major threat. The destabilising impact of proliferation on international security is intensified by the fact that such proliferation is currently developing most rapidly in areas of tension
(the Middle East and Asia), which is having the effect of both raising such tensions and, in the long term, increasing the risk that such weapons will actually be used. Despite measures adopted in the area of non-proliferation, the acceleration of trade and globalisation can facilitate the dissemination of goods and technologies which can contribute to the WMD programmes. Such developments are the result not only of a willingness on the part of certain states, but also of initiatives taken by  private and illegal networks. To this may be added the emerging risk that such weapons may be developed and used by terrorists.
Weapons of mass destruction which may be in the hands of states of concern or terrorists/non state actors constitute one of the greatest security challenges which Europeans may ever face. We must accord the highest priority to protecting European citizens and our friends and allies against the existing and growing risk presented by the proliferation of such weapons.

In order to be effective, non-proliferation measures must be based on the following principles:

  • strengthening of the non-proliferation regime through the universalisation and full implementation of the Treaties and relevant international agreements;
  • resolute action to resolve proliferation crises and ensure implementation of the UNSC resolutions;
  • resolute operational cooperation in combating proliferation in order to obstruct sensitive transfers and counter illegal networks.

The 2003 European strategy and the principles determining EU action (effective multilateralism, prevention and international cooperation) are still highly relevant and must continue to be applied.
They also assist us in implementing UNSCR 1540 which remains a milestone for the international community as far as non-proliferation is concerned. However, in the light of experience and new developments, lines for action in addition to those which have hitherto been implemented must be identified in such a way as to increase the effectiveness and impact of the EU’s approach and make it even more operational.

Our objectives are as follows:

  • – To raise the profile of non-proliferation measures within the EU by turning this fundamental security issue into a cross cutting priority of EU and Member States’ policies in respect of all aspects of action to tackle this phenomenon;
  • – To identify existing best practice with a view to encouraging the spread of such practice at the level of Member States’ national policies;

Download the full Document: http://trade.ec.europa.eu/doclib/html/141740.htm

Shipbuilding sector January 15, 2009

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Development of market share from 1.1.2000 to 30.6.2005 in % of new orders by Compensated Gross Tons (CGT).

Year

China

EU**

Japan

South Korea

Rest of the World

2000

7%

17%

25%

35%

16%

2001

12%

12%

34%

30%

12%

2002

10%

7%

36%

28%

19%

2003

14%

8%

28%

43%

7%

2004

13%

12%

30%

35%

10%

2005*

14%

17%

17%

43%

5%

Source: FMI/CESA/Lloyd’s Register

After recording a very high level of order intake in 2000, Korea experienced a serious decrease in 2001 and the first half of 2002. Korea managed to turn the decreasing trend and achieved a significant number of newbuilding intakes at the end of 2002. Korea’s position strengthened as it recorded its largest order intake in 2003 with a 43% market share. In 2004, Korean shipyards again lost 8% of their last year’s market share, although still making up a convincing 35% share of the world market. Although, Korean shipyards are suffering a reduction in profitability because of rising costs (in particular steel prices), falling US dollar and inability to adapt the prices of newbuilding contracts currently executed, their current share in the world market is going up again with 43%.

Japan’s market share in new orders was rapidly growing during the period from 2000 to 2001 and peaked to 36% in 2002. Since 2003 however it has been declining, with a small temporary revival to 30% in 2004, but a steep decline to 17% so far in 2005. An interesting phenomenon has been Japan’s and Korea’s fierce competition for the biggest annual market share in new orders during the last 5 years. Japan succeeded to be the number one in 2001 and 2002, and Korea managed to be the first in 2000, 2003, and 2004 and confirmed its supremacy in 2005.

After a strong increase in 2001, China’s market share fell back to 10% in 2002, only to rapidly recover again to 14% in 2003. Since then, its market share has been stable on 13% to 14%. China is expected to remain a very serious competitor.

The European Union shipbuilders’ market coverage has decreased from 17% in 2000 to only 7% in 2002. With only 7% and 8% respectively of world market share, the EU shipyards faced the worst crisis of their history in 2002 and 2003. Since then, the European shipbuilding industry seems to have recovered and the decreasing trend reversed to 14% in 2004 and back to 17% in 2005.

(from: Trade Issues European Commission)